From the Editor: October 2017

Autumnal Attractions

By Margaret Clay

I just love October. The burnt fall hues, the cooler breezes, boots, scarves, smart jackets, and yes, even the pumpkin spice craze … I eagerly anticipate it all.

It is also a big month for deer hunters as the “rut” reaches its peak. Read “Hiding in Plain Sight” on page 60 to learn all about the newest trends in hunting attire as well as the history behind the traditional sporting wardrobe. Thankfully, one faster-growing component for the hunting fashion industry is an expanding female repository. I spent many a hunt growing up with a spare pair of my father’s camo pants comically synched around my waist with a belt. It was a look made complete by three pairs of thick, wool socks so that I could increase my odds of walking in the enormous, male-sized boots at the end of my waders. According to Lucy Mahon, I was not alone.

However, having all the latest techy gear might, in reality, not make you look any less ridiculous! Read Tom Ryan’s humorous take on the Southern hunter on page 22 to see the category in which you — or your spouse — may fall.    

For those opposed to making themselves mosquito bait as the sun sets and who would rather spend their evenings sipping a cocktail, read “A Capital City Twist” on page 42 to learn about the history of the martini and spice up your own bartending skills with some local, award-winning recipes.

Our photo essay in this issue features many of the beautiful photographs Robert Clark shared with us from his statewide travels to South Carolina’s historic cemeteries. October leads up to All Saints Day, the church’s annual remembrance and celebration of the lives of those who have died in the past year, and Robert’s stunning photographs capture the sublime beauty of these memorials, starting on page 76.

While Oct. 31 is best known and celebrated today as Halloween, “All Hallows Eve” (the eve of All Saints Day) is also the anniversary of Martin Luther’s nailing of the 95 theses on the church doors at Wittenberg, and this year marks the quincentenary of that decisive moment that forever changed the course of history. Read Tom Smith’s article on page 34 to learn more about this controversial figure who was not only a theologian but also a brilliant composer and, more than 200 years later, a powerful inspiration to Bach.

We hope you enjoy these and the other articles in this issue!

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